Veterinary Technology

The mission of Florida A&M’s Veterinary Technology Program is to train students and inform community-based clientele and extension personnel in the application of sound science-based herd health programs designed to improve health, efficiency and management of food producing animals. 

As one of only 23 in the nation that offers a four-year degree in the area of veterinary technology, FAMU’s Vet Tech program stands alone in placing emphasis on regulatory education and training that prepares students to pursue a multitude of careers in the veterinary field. For the first two years, students concentrate on general education, introductory course requirements. At the FAMU Animal Complex in Quincy, Florida, students apply veterinary terms and concepts, and they model ethical and professional behavior under the guidance of FAMU's licensed veterinarians and technologists. The Complex houses equine, small ruminant, and swine species for use in extension, research, and teaching, and it has a kennel unit to house cats and dogs. The program is accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association, thus graduates can take the national certification examination.

For more information on this exciting major click here.

For admission information, please check here.

For scholarship information, please check here.

For apply for FAMU, you can click here.

CONTACT:

Glen Wright, DVM  
Program Leader
E-mail: glen.wright@famu.edu  vet.tech@famu.edu
Phone:
(850) 599-8433

VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

 

Veterinary Technologists are essential to the art and science of animal health. They provide necessary medical and non-medical support to veterinarians, and have a significant impact in research, biodefense and food safety. The mission of Florida A&M’s Veterinary Technology Program is to train students and inform community-based clientele and extension personnel in the application of sound science-based herd health programs designed to improve health, efficiency and management of food producing animals. Our program is one of only eighteen in the nation to offer a four year degree in the area of Veterinary Technology, and stands alone in placing emphasis on regulatory education and training. 

The Animal Science Program (Veterinary Technology Track) is an intensive four year degree program which trains students to provide medical and non-medical support to veterinarians. During the first two years, students will concentrate on the core Animal Science major requirements. The latter half of the program consists of clinical rotations at the Florida A&M Animal Healthcare Complex in Quincy, Florida. Here students will practically apply veterinary team concepts, and model ethical and professional behavior under the guidance of FAMU’s licensed veterinarians. The complex mirrors the most technologically advanced large animal clinics, and houses small ruminant, swine, and equine species for use in teaching. Upon accreditation, our graduates will be eligible for certification by the Florida Veterinary Medical Association.    

Entry into the Animal Science/Veterinary Technology program is only available in the fall semester. We are only accepting incoming freshmen until fall of 2011. The College of Engineering Sciences, Technology and Agriculture requires students to have an overall GPA of 2.0 and a strong background in mathematics and the sciences. Please refer to the University’s admissions page for more detailed information.

APPLY ON-LINE NOW! Please click here.

The program gives students many different experiences in animal science to help them better understand and refine their career paths and the opportunity to apply for early admission to FAMU.

The program targets diverse populations of current 8-11 (rising 9th-12th) grade students from across the country interested in animal science, veterinary medicine, and related fields

FAMU AGDISCOVERY SUMMARY DESCRIPTION

AgDiscovery at Florida A&M University (FAMU) is a two-week summer outreach program. The program targets diverse populations of current 8-11 (rising 9th-12th) grade students from across the country interested in animal science, veterinary medicine, and related fields. Students gained experiential learning via different delivery approaches through workshops, laboratory and field exercises, and various cultural and teambuilding activities.

The program gives students many different experiences in animal science to help them better understand and refine their career paths and the opportunity to apply for early admission to FAMU.

In an in-person setting, students live on FAMU's campus for the duration of the program free of cost and receiving complete safety and security services.

FAMU AgDiscovery is annual and starts on the second Sunday in June and ends in two weeks on a Saturday. More information about 2022 program information, please click here.

Application:

The application will start in late December 2021, and you may find the application and related information at the USDA website www.aphis.usda.gov/agdiscovery.

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Carmen Lyttle-Nguessan

Phone:(850) 412-5363

Email: carmen.lyttlenguessa@famu.edu

Dr. Glen Wright

Phone: (850) 599-8433

Email: glen.wright@famu.edu

Veterinary technologist, sometimes called veterinary technicians, work as part of a healthcare team. They are supervised by veterinarians, who diagnose disease and injury, prescribe treatments, and perform surgery on animals. The technologist’s job is to offer skilled, medical assistance to the veterinarian. Veterinary technicians who have earned a bachelor’s degree are given the title of veterinary technologist. They might perform more advanced tests and procedures and are often well placed for jobs in hospital management, scientific research, or work in a complex veterinary specialty, such as herd health or critical care.  Most states require veterinary technologists to be licensed before they can work. Requirements vary for licensure; some states usually require technicians to pass the National Veterinary Technician Exam.

FAMU Veterinary Technology Partners with Gadsden County Animal Shelter (video)

http://www.wctv.tv/home/headlines/80949027.html

Veterinary Technology Named Top Recession-Proof Career (video)
http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=4817004n
-courtesy of CBS Evening News

Veterinarian - US News and World Report

http://www.usnews.com/money/careers/articles/2009/12/28/veterinarian.html

Watch a Food Supply Veterinarian at Work
http://www.avmatv.org/media.cfm?c=201&m=1005&s=67&

Learn Where There Are Critical Shortages in Food Supply Veterinary Medicine and How YOU Can Fill Them

http://www.avma.org/fsvm/default.asp- courtesy of the American Veterinary Medical Association

 

AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
www.avma.org/


NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF VETERINARY TECHNICIANS IN AMERICA
www.navta.net


FLORIDA VETERINARY TECHNICIAN ASSOCIATION
www.fvta.net/floridaveterinarytechnicianassociation/


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE- ANIMAL AND PLANT INSPECTION SERVICE
www.aphis.usda.gov/


THE UNITED STATES ARMY VETERINARY CORP
www.goarmy.com/amedd/vet/index.jsp
www.goarmy.com/JobDetail.do

FLORIDA A&M VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY BRINGS HEALTHCARE
TO GADSDEN COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER


Watch Us on WCTV-CBS Tallahassee

Read The Story in the Tallahassee Democrat

 

CBS EVENING NEWS  NAMES VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY A "TOP RECESSION-PROOF CAREER"
watch here


EBONY MAGAZINE
  August 2009
FLORIDA A&M VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY A PROGRAM "WORTH NOTING"
read here


DIVERSE ISSUES IN HIGHER EDUCATION  August 20, 2009
FAMU helps "address a critical national shortage of minorities in the field of veterinary medicine and related disciplines.” 
read here

Veterinary technologists are often called animal nurses because they care for animal patients the way nurses care for humans. But veterinary technologists’ responsibilities extend beyond nursing, combining duties of many human healthcare jobs. In addition to providing general nursing, technicians help to administer and monitor anesthesia just as surgical nurses do, take x-rays and sonograms like radiological technicians, clean teeth like dental technicians, provide rehabilitation like physical therapy aides, monitor surgical equipment like surgical technicians, and conduct laboratory tests like clinical laboratory technicians. Many people are attracted to veterinary technology because they love animals—and that’s a good foundation for a veterinary career. But veterinary technologists also need solid scientific skills. As veterinary medicine becomes more advanced, the duties of technicians are becoming more complex and varied.

In many cases, a veterinary technologist’s first step in caring for an animal is to give a general exam by looking for external parasites, anatomical problems, or other medical issues that should be brought to the veterinarian’s attention. Technologists need to know what’s considered normal for a wide variety of species and breeds. They talk to the animal’s owner, asking specific questions to uncover symptoms. In addition, veterinary technologists provide direct care, administering prescribed medicines or vaccinations orally or by injection.

Technologists take animals’ temperature, blood pressure, respiration, EKG readings, and other vital statistics. They collect samples by drawing blood, scraping skin, or collecting bodily fluids and waste. Bodily fluids are examined through a microscope, for example, to identify bacteria, toxins, parasites, or nutrient deficiencies. And tissue cells are cultured and checked for signs of cancer or other abnormalities. Analyzing test samples is a little like detective work, with technologists looking for clues about what’s wrong with an animal. Veterinarians rely on the results to make the right diagnosis.

A veterinary technologists’ work extends to people as well as to animals. Technologists often spend more time with people and their animals than veterinarians do. They write after-care instructions for animal owners, calm owners’ fears, and answer questions. Many supervise other animal-care workers and entry-level technicians and assistants. Technologists who work at veterinary teaching hospitals show veterinary students how to insert catheters, give injections, and perform other procedures.

Employment of veterinary technologists is expected to grow 41 percent over the 2006-16 projection period, which is much faster than the average for all occupations. Pet owners are becoming more affluent and more willing to pay for advanced veterinary care because many of them consider their pet to be part of the family. This growing affluence and view of pets will continue to increase the demand for veterinary care. The vast majority of veterinary technicians work at private clinical practice under Veterinarians. As the number of Veterinarians grows to meet the demand for veterinary care, so will the number of veterinary technicians needed to assist them.

Biomedical facilities, diagnostic laboratories, wildlife facilities, humane societies, animal control facilities, drug or food manufacturing companies, and food safety inspection facilities will provide additional jobs for veterinary technologists and technicians. However, keen competition is expected for veterinary technologist and technician jobs in zoos and aquariums

Veterinary Technology  Faculty Profiles

 

GlenGlen Wright, DVM  
Program Leader
E-mail: glen.wright@famu.edu  vet.tech@famu.edu
Phone: 
(850) 599-8433

Jennifer

Jennifer Mathews, DVM

PhD, The Ohio State University

E-mail: jennifer.mathews@famu.edu

Areas of Interest: Analysis of clinical pathology data from veterinary patients, including complete blood counts, clinical chemistry profiles, urinalyses, and cytological specimens Antimicrobial resistance in nosocomial bacterial pathogens Molecular epidemiology of zoonotic and nosocomial bacterial pathogens

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Norman Scarbrough, CVT

B.S., University of Phoenix 

Emailnorman.scarbrough@famu.edu

Areas of Interest: Veterinary Technology

Julie

Julie-Anne Valliant, CVT
Queen's University, BA
Emailjulieanne.valliant@famu.edu

Areas of Interest: Fear Free Animal Handling Veterinary Technology Title Protection One Health Initiatives